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Ancestral Legacy  - Terminal

Ancestral Legacy - Terminal

Label : Whispering Voice Records | Archive under gothic metal

Release type: Full-length CD

Vera : Ancestral Legacy has been around since the nineties, but there were only a large number of demos, before they finally came up with their debut ‘Of Magic Illusions’ in 2005. In 2010 they released the album ‘Nightmare Diaries’, but ‘Terminal’ can be considered as a new start with another female singer and a new label. The musical direction of this Norwegian five-piece can be described as gothic doom/death metal with any progressive influences (loads of twists and turns in the lengthy songs).

Female singer Isadora Cortina, who used to do some guest vocals for the band in the past, has now permanently taken over the torch from Elin Anita Omholt. She is Mexican, but now she lives in Norway while being classical trained. Her voice is typical for gothic bands: high-pitched and lovely. As contrast we have harsh vocals of guitarist Eddie Risdal; they are okay too. His growling vocal guest appearance could also be noticed in two songs on Dan Swanö’s ‘Witherscape’ album. Yet Ancestral Legacy happens to be most interesting at instrumental level, due to the opulence of twists and turns and unexpected accents. Not all of them are properly fluent, but they help to keep you focused. Although the by Jone Vaananen (Insomnium, Ikuinen Kaamos) in Finland mixed and mastered album builds up proper dynamics with atmospheric passages (piano or acoustic guitars) and pithy accelerations (sometimes verging to black), seventy minutes length is quite long to engross constantly. With ‘Bone Code’ and ‘Lethe Part 1’ we already get a good impression of the band’s capabilities. During ‘There Is No Birth And Death’ and ‘Dawn Of Time’ they slacken down pace towards ballad-like atmospheres. Any storytelling folk influences pop up in ‘Transient Pale Days’ and towards the end one can find any pure new wave vibes in the guitars and bass.


We can conclude that ‘Terminal’ turned into a meritorious effort to come up with a personal blend of all kinds of styles, with doom-like gothic from the nineties as pivotal genre.

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